Carbon nanotube (CNT)–modified surfaces unequivocally demonstrate their biocompatibility and ability to boost the electrical activity of neuronal cells cultured on them. Reasons for this effect are still under debate. However, the intimate contact at the membrane level between these thready nanostructures and cells, in combination with their unique electrical properties, seems to play an important role. The entire existing literature exploiting the effect of CNTs on modulating cellular behavior deals with cell cultures grown on purified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) deposited on a supporting surface via drop-casting or mechanical entrapment. Here, for the first time, it is demonstrated that CNTs directly grown on a supporting silicon surface by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD)–assisted technique have the same effect. It is shown that primary neuronal cells developed above a carpet of CVD CNTs form a healthy and functional network. The resulting neuronal network shows increased electrical activity when compared to a similar network developed on a control glass surface. The low cost and high versatility of the here presented CVD-based synthesis process, together with the possibility to create on supporting substrate patterns of any arbitrary shape of CNTs, open up new opportunities for brain–machine interfaces or neuroprosthetic devices.

Carbon Nanotubes, Directly Grown on Supporting Surfaces, Improve Neuronal Activity in Hippocampal Neuronal Networks / Rago, I.; Rauti, R.; Bevilacqua, M.; Calaresu, I.; Pozzato, A.; Cibinel, M.; Dalmiglio, M.; Tavagnacco, C.; Goldoni, A.; Scaini, D.. - In: ADVANCED BIOSYSTEMS. - ISSN 2366-7478. - 3:5(2019), pp. 1-13. [10.1002/adbi.201800286]

Carbon Nanotubes, Directly Grown on Supporting Surfaces, Improve Neuronal Activity in Hippocampal Neuronal Networks

Rauti R.;Calaresu I.;Scaini D.
2019

Abstract

Carbon nanotube (CNT)–modified surfaces unequivocally demonstrate their biocompatibility and ability to boost the electrical activity of neuronal cells cultured on them. Reasons for this effect are still under debate. However, the intimate contact at the membrane level between these thready nanostructures and cells, in combination with their unique electrical properties, seems to play an important role. The entire existing literature exploiting the effect of CNTs on modulating cellular behavior deals with cell cultures grown on purified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) deposited on a supporting surface via drop-casting or mechanical entrapment. Here, for the first time, it is demonstrated that CNTs directly grown on a supporting silicon surface by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD)–assisted technique have the same effect. It is shown that primary neuronal cells developed above a carpet of CVD CNTs form a healthy and functional network. The resulting neuronal network shows increased electrical activity when compared to a similar network developed on a control glass surface. The low cost and high versatility of the here presented CVD-based synthesis process, together with the possibility to create on supporting substrate patterns of any arbitrary shape of CNTs, open up new opportunities for brain–machine interfaces or neuroprosthetic devices.
3
5
1
13
1800286
https://doi.org/10.1002/adbi.201800286
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/23667478
Rago, I.; Rauti, R.; Bevilacqua, M.; Calaresu, I.; Pozzato, A.; Cibinel, M.; Dalmiglio, M.; Tavagnacco, C.; Goldoni, A.; Scaini, D.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
2019 – Carbon Nanotubes Directly Grown on Supporting Surfaces Improve Neuronal Activity in Hippocampal Neuronal Networks.pdf

non disponibili

Tipologia: Versione Editoriale (PDF)
Licenza: Non specificato
Dimensione 6.85 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
6.85 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11767/106754
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 14
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 14
social impact