The perception of a visual event (e.g., a flock of birds) at the present moment can be biased by a previous perceptual experience (e.g., the perception of an earlier flock). Serial dependence is a perceptual bias whereby a current stimulus appears more similar to a previous one than it actually is. Whereas serial dependence emerges within several visual stimulus dimensions, whether it could simultaneously operate across different dimensions of the same stimulus (e.g., the numerosity and the duration of a visual pattern) remains unclear. Here we address this question by assessing the presence of serial dependence across duration and numerosity, two stimulus dimensions that are often associated and can bias each other. Participants performed either a duration or a numerosity discrimination task, in which they compared a constant reference with a variable test stimulus, varying along the task-relevant dimension (either duration or numerosity). Serial dependence was induced by a task-irrelevant inducer, that is, a stimulus presented before the reference and always varying in both duration and numerosity. The results show systematic serial dependencies only within the task-relevant stimulus dimension, that is, stimulus numerosity affects numerosity perception only, and duration affects duration perception only. Additionally, at least in the numerosity condition, the task-irrelevant dimension of the inducer (duration) had an opposite, repulsive effect. These findings thus show that attractive serial dependence operates in a highly specific fashion and does not transfer across different stimulus dimensions. Instead, the repulsive influence, possibly reflecting perceptual adaptation, can transfer from one dimension to another.

Serial dependence in time and numerosity perception is dimension-specific / Togoli, I.; Fedele, M.; Fornaciai, M.; Bueti, D.. - In: JOURNAL OF VISION. - ISSN 1534-7362. - 21:5(2021), pp. 1-15. [10.1167/jov.21.5.6]

Serial dependence in time and numerosity perception is dimension-specific

Togoli I.
;
Fedele M.;Fornaciai M.;Bueti D.
2021-01-01

Abstract

The perception of a visual event (e.g., a flock of birds) at the present moment can be biased by a previous perceptual experience (e.g., the perception of an earlier flock). Serial dependence is a perceptual bias whereby a current stimulus appears more similar to a previous one than it actually is. Whereas serial dependence emerges within several visual stimulus dimensions, whether it could simultaneously operate across different dimensions of the same stimulus (e.g., the numerosity and the duration of a visual pattern) remains unclear. Here we address this question by assessing the presence of serial dependence across duration and numerosity, two stimulus dimensions that are often associated and can bias each other. Participants performed either a duration or a numerosity discrimination task, in which they compared a constant reference with a variable test stimulus, varying along the task-relevant dimension (either duration or numerosity). Serial dependence was induced by a task-irrelevant inducer, that is, a stimulus presented before the reference and always varying in both duration and numerosity. The results show systematic serial dependencies only within the task-relevant stimulus dimension, that is, stimulus numerosity affects numerosity perception only, and duration affects duration perception only. Additionally, at least in the numerosity condition, the task-irrelevant dimension of the inducer (duration) had an opposite, repulsive effect. These findings thus show that attractive serial dependence operates in a highly specific fashion and does not transfer across different stimulus dimensions. Instead, the repulsive influence, possibly reflecting perceptual adaptation, can transfer from one dimension to another.
2021
21
5
1
15
6
10.1167/jov.21.5.6
https://jov.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?articleid=2772570
Togoli, I.; Fedele, M.; Fornaciai, M.; Bueti, D.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11767/123369
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