The possible neurodevelopmental consequences of SARS-CoV-2 infection are presently unknown. In utero exposure to SARS-CoV-2 has been hypothesized to affect the developing brain, possibly disrupting neurodevelopment of children. Spike protein interactors, such as ACE2, have been found expressed in the fetal brain, and could play a role in potential SARS-CoV-2 fetal brain pathogenesis. Apart from the possible direct involvement of SARS-CoV-2 or its specific viral components in the occurrence of neurological and neurodevelopmental manifestations, we recently reported the presence of toxin-like peptides in plasma, urine and fecal samples specifically from COVID-19 patients. In this study, we investigated the possible neurotoxic effects elicited upon 72-hour exposure to human relevant levels of recombinant spike protein, toxin-like peptides found in COVID-19 patients, as well as a combination of both in 3D human iPSC-derived neural stem cells differentiated for either 2 weeks (short-term) or 8 weeks (long-term, 2 weeks in suspension + 6 weeks on MEA) towards neurons/glia. Whole transcriptome and qPCR analysis revealed that spike protein and toxin-like peptides at noncytotoxic concentrations differentially perturb the expression of SPHK1, ELN, GASK1B, HEY1, UTS2, ACE2 and some neuronal-, glia- and NSC-related genes critical during brain development. Additionally, exposure to spike protein caused a decrease of spontaneous electrical activity after two days in long-term differentiated cultures. The perturbations of these neurodevelopmental endpoints are discussed in the context of recent knowledge about the key events described in Adverse Outcome Pathways relevant to COVID-19, gathered in the context of the CIAO project (https://www.ciao-covid.net/).

Effects of spike protein and toxin-like peptides found in COVID-19 patients on human 3D neuronal/glial model undergoing differentiation: Possible implications for SARS-CoV-2 impact on brain development / Pistollato, Francesca; Petrillo, Mauro; Clerbaux, Laure-Alix; Leoni, Gabriele; Ponti, Jessica; Bogni, Alessia; Brogna, Carlo; Cristoni, Simone; Sanges, Remo; Mendoza-de Gyves, Emilio; Fabbri, Marco; Querci, Maddalena; Soares, Helena; Munoz, Amalia; Whelan, Maurice; Van de Eede, Guy. - In: REPRODUCTIVE TOXICOLOGY. - ISSN 0890-6238. - 111:(2022), pp. 34-48. [10.1016/j.reprotox.2022.04.011]

Effects of spike protein and toxin-like peptides found in COVID-19 patients on human 3D neuronal/glial model undergoing differentiation: Possible implications for SARS-CoV-2 impact on brain development

Leoni, Gabriele;Sanges, Remo;
2022-01-01

Abstract

The possible neurodevelopmental consequences of SARS-CoV-2 infection are presently unknown. In utero exposure to SARS-CoV-2 has been hypothesized to affect the developing brain, possibly disrupting neurodevelopment of children. Spike protein interactors, such as ACE2, have been found expressed in the fetal brain, and could play a role in potential SARS-CoV-2 fetal brain pathogenesis. Apart from the possible direct involvement of SARS-CoV-2 or its specific viral components in the occurrence of neurological and neurodevelopmental manifestations, we recently reported the presence of toxin-like peptides in plasma, urine and fecal samples specifically from COVID-19 patients. In this study, we investigated the possible neurotoxic effects elicited upon 72-hour exposure to human relevant levels of recombinant spike protein, toxin-like peptides found in COVID-19 patients, as well as a combination of both in 3D human iPSC-derived neural stem cells differentiated for either 2 weeks (short-term) or 8 weeks (long-term, 2 weeks in suspension + 6 weeks on MEA) towards neurons/glia. Whole transcriptome and qPCR analysis revealed that spike protein and toxin-like peptides at noncytotoxic concentrations differentially perturb the expression of SPHK1, ELN, GASK1B, HEY1, UTS2, ACE2 and some neuronal-, glia- and NSC-related genes critical during brain development. Additionally, exposure to spike protein caused a decrease of spontaneous electrical activity after two days in long-term differentiated cultures. The perturbations of these neurodevelopmental endpoints are discussed in the context of recent knowledge about the key events described in Adverse Outcome Pathways relevant to COVID-19, gathered in the context of the CIAO project (https://www.ciao-covid.net/).
2022
111
34
48
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35525527/
Pistollato, Francesca; Petrillo, Mauro; Clerbaux, Laure-Alix; Leoni, Gabriele; Ponti, Jessica; Bogni, Alessia; Brogna, Carlo; Cristoni, Simone; Sanges, Remo; Mendoza-de Gyves, Emilio; Fabbri, Marco; Querci, Maddalena; Soares, Helena; Munoz, Amalia; Whelan, Maurice; Van de Eede, Guy
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11767/132111
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