We present, on the simplest possible case, what we consider as the very basic features of the (brand new) virtual element method. As the readers will easily recognize, the virtual element method could easily be regarded as the ultimate evolution of the mimetic finite differences approach. However, in their last step they became so close to the traditional finite elements that we decided to use a different perspective and a different name. Now the virtual element spaces are just like the usual finite element spaces with the addition of suitable non-polynomial functions. This is far from being a new idea. See for instance the very early approach of E. Wachspress [A Rational Finite Element Basic (Academic Press, 1975)] or the more recent overview of T.-P. Fries and T. Belytschko [The extended/generalized finite element method: An overview of the method and its applications, Int. J. Numer. Methods Engrg. 84 (2010) 253-304]. The novelty here is to take the spaces and the degrees of freedom in such a way that the elementary stiffness matrix can be computed without actually computing these non-polynomial functions, but just using the degrees of freedom. In doing that we can easily deal with complicated element geometries and/or higher-order continuity conditions (like C1, C2, etc.). The idea is quite general, and could be applied to a number of different situations and problems. Here however we want to be as clear as possible, and to present the simplest possible case that still gives the flavor of the whole idea. © 2013 World Scientific Publishing Company.

Basic principles of virtual element methods / Beirao Da Veiga, L.; Brezzi, F.; Cangiani, A.; Manzini, G.; Marini, L. D.; Russo, A.. - In: MATHEMATICAL MODELS AND METHODS IN APPLIED SCIENCES. - ISSN 0218-2025. - 23:1(2013), pp. 199-214. [10.1142/S0218202512500492]

Basic principles of virtual element methods

Brezzi F.;Cangiani A.;Marini L. D.
;
2013-01-01

Abstract

We present, on the simplest possible case, what we consider as the very basic features of the (brand new) virtual element method. As the readers will easily recognize, the virtual element method could easily be regarded as the ultimate evolution of the mimetic finite differences approach. However, in their last step they became so close to the traditional finite elements that we decided to use a different perspective and a different name. Now the virtual element spaces are just like the usual finite element spaces with the addition of suitable non-polynomial functions. This is far from being a new idea. See for instance the very early approach of E. Wachspress [A Rational Finite Element Basic (Academic Press, 1975)] or the more recent overview of T.-P. Fries and T. Belytschko [The extended/generalized finite element method: An overview of the method and its applications, Int. J. Numer. Methods Engrg. 84 (2010) 253-304]. The novelty here is to take the spaces and the degrees of freedom in such a way that the elementary stiffness matrix can be computed without actually computing these non-polynomial functions, but just using the degrees of freedom. In doing that we can easily deal with complicated element geometries and/or higher-order continuity conditions (like C1, C2, etc.). The idea is quite general, and could be applied to a number of different situations and problems. Here however we want to be as clear as possible, and to present the simplest possible case that still gives the flavor of the whole idea. © 2013 World Scientific Publishing Company.
2013
23
1
199
214
Beirao Da Veiga, L.; Brezzi, F.; Cangiani, A.; Manzini, G.; Marini, L. D.; Russo, A.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11767/135253
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