Previous research strongly suggest that morphologically-complex words are recognized in terms of their constituent morphemes. A question thus arises as to how the recognition system codes for morpheme position within words, given that it needs to distinguish morphological anagrams like overhang and hangover. The present study focused specifically on whether the recognition of suffixes occurs in a position‑specific fashion. Experiments 1 and 2 revealed that morphologically-complex nonwords (gasful) are rejected more slowly than orthographic controls (gasfil), but that the same interference effect is not present when the morphemic constituents are reversed (fulgas versus filgas). Experiment 3 went further in demonstrating that reversing the morphemes within words (e.g., nesskind) does not yield morpheme interference effects against orthographic controls (e.g., nusskind). These results strongly suggest that suffix identification is position-specific, which poses important constraints on the further development of models of morphological processing

Morphemes in their place: Evidence for position specific identification of suffixes / Crepaldi, Davide; Rastle, K.; Davis, C. J.. - In: MEMORY & COGNITION. - ISSN 0090-502X. - 38:3(2010), pp. 312-321. [10.3758/MC.38.3.312]

Morphemes in their place: Evidence for position specific identification of suffixes

Crepaldi, Davide;
2010

Abstract

Previous research strongly suggest that morphologically-complex words are recognized in terms of their constituent morphemes. A question thus arises as to how the recognition system codes for morpheme position within words, given that it needs to distinguish morphological anagrams like overhang and hangover. The present study focused specifically on whether the recognition of suffixes occurs in a position‑specific fashion. Experiments 1 and 2 revealed that morphologically-complex nonwords (gasful) are rejected more slowly than orthographic controls (gasfil), but that the same interference effect is not present when the morphemic constituents are reversed (fulgas versus filgas). Experiment 3 went further in demonstrating that reversing the morphemes within words (e.g., nesskind) does not yield morpheme interference effects against orthographic controls (e.g., nusskind). These results strongly suggest that suffix identification is position-specific, which poses important constraints on the further development of models of morphological processing
38
3
312
321
Crepaldi, Davide; Rastle, K.; Davis, C. J.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
MC.38.3.312.pdf

non disponibili

Tipologia: Versione Editoriale (PDF)
Licenza: Non specificato
Dimensione 151.52 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
151.52 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11767/16876
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 5
  • Scopus 44
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 41
social impact