Following on after three previous papers discussing the formation of primordial black holes during the radiative era of the early universe, we present here a further investigation of the critical nature of the process involved, aimed at making contact with some of the basic underlying ideas from the literature on critical collapse. We focus on the intermediate state, which we have found appearing in cases with perturbations close to the critical limit, and examine the connection between this and the similarity solutions which play a fundamental role in the standard picture of critical collapse. We have derived a set of self-similar equations for the null-slicing form of the metric which we are using for our numerical calculations, and have then compared the results obtained by integrating these with the ones coming from our simulations for the collapse of cosmological perturbations within an expanding universe. We find that the similarity solution is asymptotically approached in a region which grows to cover both the contracting matter and part of the semi-void which forms outside it. Our main interest is in the situation relevant for primordial black hole formation in the radiative era of the early universe, where the relation between the pressure p and the energy density e can be reasonably approximated by an expression of the form p = we with w = 1/3. However, we have also looked at other values of w, both because these have been considered in the previous literature and also because they can be helpful for giving further insight into situations relevant for primordial black hole formation. As in our previous work, we have started our simulations with initial supra-horizon scale perturbations of a type which could have come from inflation.

Primordial black hole formation in the early universe: critical behaviour and self-similarity / Musco, I; Miller, John. - In: CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM GRAVITY. - ISSN 0264-9381. - 30:14(2013), pp. 145009.1-145009.19. [10.1088/0264-9381/30/14/145009]

Primordial black hole formation in the early universe: critical behaviour and self-similarity

Miller, John
2013-01-01

Abstract

Following on after three previous papers discussing the formation of primordial black holes during the radiative era of the early universe, we present here a further investigation of the critical nature of the process involved, aimed at making contact with some of the basic underlying ideas from the literature on critical collapse. We focus on the intermediate state, which we have found appearing in cases with perturbations close to the critical limit, and examine the connection between this and the similarity solutions which play a fundamental role in the standard picture of critical collapse. We have derived a set of self-similar equations for the null-slicing form of the metric which we are using for our numerical calculations, and have then compared the results obtained by integrating these with the ones coming from our simulations for the collapse of cosmological perturbations within an expanding universe. We find that the similarity solution is asymptotically approached in a region which grows to cover both the contracting matter and part of the semi-void which forms outside it. Our main interest is in the situation relevant for primordial black hole formation in the radiative era of the early universe, where the relation between the pressure p and the energy density e can be reasonably approximated by an expression of the form p = we with w = 1/3. However, we have also looked at other values of w, both because these have been considered in the previous literature and also because they can be helpful for giving further insight into situations relevant for primordial black hole formation. As in our previous work, we have started our simulations with initial supra-horizon scale perturbations of a type which could have come from inflation.
2013
30
14
1
19
145009
https://arxiv.org/abs/1201.2379
Musco, I; Miller, John
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11767/30023
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