Functional imaging studies of learning and memory have primarily focused on stimulus material presented within a single modality (see review by Gabrieli, 1998, Annu. Rev. Psychol. 49: 87-115). In the present study we investigated mechanisms for learning material presented in visual and auditory modalities, using single-trial functional magnetic resonance imaging. We evaluated time-dependent learning effects under two conditions involving presentation of consistent (repeatedly paired in the same combination) or inconsistent (items presented randomly paired) pairs. We also evaluated time-dependent changes for bimodal (auditory and visual) presentations relative to a condition in which auditory stimuli were repeatedly presented alone. Using a time by condition analysis to compare neural responses to consistent versus inconsistent audiovisual pairs, we found significant time-dependent learning effects in medial parietal and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortices. In contrast, time-dependent effects were seen in left angular gyrus, bilateral anterior cingulate gyrus, and occipital areas bilaterally. A comparison of paired (bimodal) versus unpaired (unimodal) conditions was associated with time-dependent changes in posterior hippocampal and superior frontal regions for both consistent and inconsistent pairs. The results provide evidence that associative learning for stimuli presented in different sensory modalities is supported by neural mechanisms similar to those described for other kinds of memory processes. The involvement of posterior hippocampus and superior frontal gyrus in bimodal learning for both consistent and inconsistent pairs supports a putative function for these regions in associative learning independent of sensory modality.

Time-dependent changes in learning audiovisual associations: A single-trial fMRI study / Gonzalo, D; Shallice, Timothy; Dolan, R.. - In: NEUROIMAGE. - ISSN 1053-8119. - 11:3(2000), pp. 243-255. [10.1006/nimg.2000.0540]

Time-dependent changes in learning audiovisual associations: A single-trial fMRI study

Shallice, Timothy;
2000

Abstract

Functional imaging studies of learning and memory have primarily focused on stimulus material presented within a single modality (see review by Gabrieli, 1998, Annu. Rev. Psychol. 49: 87-115). In the present study we investigated mechanisms for learning material presented in visual and auditory modalities, using single-trial functional magnetic resonance imaging. We evaluated time-dependent learning effects under two conditions involving presentation of consistent (repeatedly paired in the same combination) or inconsistent (items presented randomly paired) pairs. We also evaluated time-dependent changes for bimodal (auditory and visual) presentations relative to a condition in which auditory stimuli were repeatedly presented alone. Using a time by condition analysis to compare neural responses to consistent versus inconsistent audiovisual pairs, we found significant time-dependent learning effects in medial parietal and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortices. In contrast, time-dependent effects were seen in left angular gyrus, bilateral anterior cingulate gyrus, and occipital areas bilaterally. A comparison of paired (bimodal) versus unpaired (unimodal) conditions was associated with time-dependent changes in posterior hippocampal and superior frontal regions for both consistent and inconsistent pairs. The results provide evidence that associative learning for stimuli presented in different sensory modalities is supported by neural mechanisms similar to those described for other kinds of memory processes. The involvement of posterior hippocampus and superior frontal gyrus in bimodal learning for both consistent and inconsistent pairs supports a putative function for these regions in associative learning independent of sensory modality.
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Gonzalo, D; Shallice, Timothy; Dolan, R.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11767/30319
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