Imitation can be realized via two different routes: a direct route that translates visual input into motor output when gestures are meaningless or unknown, and a semantic route for known/meaningful gestures. Young infants show imitative behaviours compatible with the direct route, but little is known about the development of the semantic route, studied here for the first time. The present study examined preschool children (3–5 years of age) imitating gestures that could be transitive or intransitive, and meaningful or meaningless. Both routes for imitation were already present by three years of age, and children were more accurate at imitating meaningful-intransitive gestures than meaningless-intransitive ones; the reverse pattern was found for transitive gestures. Children preferred to use their dominant hand even if they had to anatomically imitate the model to do this, showing that a preference for specular imitation is not exclusive at these ages.

Dual-route imitation in preschool children / Sebastianutto, L.; Mengotti, P.; Spiezio, C.; Rumiati, R.; Balaban, E.. - In: ACTA PSYCHOLOGICA. - ISSN 0001-6918. - 173(2017), pp. 94-100. [10.1016/j.actpsy.2016.12.007]

Dual-route imitation in preschool children

Sebastianutto, L.;Mengotti, P.;Spiezio, C.;Rumiati, R.;
2017

Abstract

Imitation can be realized via two different routes: a direct route that translates visual input into motor output when gestures are meaningless or unknown, and a semantic route for known/meaningful gestures. Young infants show imitative behaviours compatible with the direct route, but little is known about the development of the semantic route, studied here for the first time. The present study examined preschool children (3–5 years of age) imitating gestures that could be transitive or intransitive, and meaningful or meaningless. Both routes for imitation were already present by three years of age, and children were more accurate at imitating meaningful-intransitive gestures than meaningless-intransitive ones; the reverse pattern was found for transitive gestures. Children preferred to use their dominant hand even if they had to anatomically imitate the model to do this, showing that a preference for specular imitation is not exclusive at these ages.
173
94
100
www.elsevier.com/locate/actpsy
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0001691816304000?via%3Dihub
Sebastianutto, L.; Mengotti, P.; Spiezio, C.; Rumiati, R.; Balaban, E.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11767/88405
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