The common octopus, Octopus vulgaris, is an active marine predator known for the richness and plasticity of its behavioral repertoire, and remarkable learning and memory capabilities. Octopus and other coleoid cephalopods, cuttlefish and squid, possess the largest nervous system among invertebrates, both for cell counts and body to brain size. O. vulgaris has been at the center of a long-tradition of research into diverse aspects of its biology. To leverage research in this iconic species, we generated 270 Gb of genomic sequencing data, complementing those available for the only other sequenced congeneric octopus, Octopus bimaculoides. We show that both genomes are similar in size, but display different levels of heterozygosity and repeats. Our data give a first quantitative glimpse into the rate of coding and non-coding regions and support the view that hundreds of novel genes may have arisen independently despite the close phylogenetic distance. We furthermore describe a reference-guided assembly and an open genomic resource (CephRes-gdatabase), opening new avenues in the study of genomic novelties in cephalopods and their biology.

The survey and reference assisted assembly of the Octopus vulgaris genome / Zarrella, I.; Herten, K.; Maes, G. E.; Tai, S.; Yang, M.; Seuntjens, E.; Ritschard, E. A.; Zach, M.; Styfhals, R.; Sanges, R.; Simakov, O.; Ponte, G.; Fiorito, G.. - In: SCIENTIFIC DATA. - ISSN 2052-4463. - 6:1(2019), pp. 1-8. [10.1038/s41597-019-0017-6]

The survey and reference assisted assembly of the Octopus vulgaris genome

Sanges R.
Membro del Collaboration group
;
2019

Abstract

The common octopus, Octopus vulgaris, is an active marine predator known for the richness and plasticity of its behavioral repertoire, and remarkable learning and memory capabilities. Octopus and other coleoid cephalopods, cuttlefish and squid, possess the largest nervous system among invertebrates, both for cell counts and body to brain size. O. vulgaris has been at the center of a long-tradition of research into diverse aspects of its biology. To leverage research in this iconic species, we generated 270 Gb of genomic sequencing data, complementing those available for the only other sequenced congeneric octopus, Octopus bimaculoides. We show that both genomes are similar in size, but display different levels of heterozygosity and repeats. Our data give a first quantitative glimpse into the rate of coding and non-coding regions and support the view that hundreds of novel genes may have arisen independently despite the close phylogenetic distance. We furthermore describe a reference-guided assembly and an open genomic resource (CephRes-gdatabase), opening new avenues in the study of genomic novelties in cephalopods and their biology.
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https://doi.org/10.1038/s41597-019-0017-6
Zarrella, I.; Herten, K.; Maes, G. E.; Tai, S.; Yang, M.; Seuntjens, E.; Ritschard, E. A.; Zach, M.; Styfhals, R.; Sanges, R.; Simakov, O.; Ponte, G.; Fiorito, G.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11767/95568
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