Reading seems as easy and natural as listening. It is still not clear how we acquire this skill, and how visual word identification mechanisms are refined through reading experience. Theoretical models of word recognition describe general principles of skilled reading behaviour. However, these models have been based on averaged data from relatively small samples of skilled readers, mainly English native speakers, and are based on the assumption that skilled reading involves a specialized system of word identification. In this thesis it is proposed that expert reading requires the development and refinement of basic visual processing mechanisms originally employed to identify everyday objects, and then adapted to reading. To test this hypothesis, I carried out three experiments investigating: (i) how L2 visual word recognition changes with growing proficiency; (ii) how novel lexical memories are integrated into the lexicon, i.e., how they interact with previously existing words; and (iii) how sensitivity to the lexicon statistics plays out in the process of learning a novel set of visual stimuli, either in the language and non--language domain.

Learning to recognize novel words and novel objects / Viviani, Eva. - (2019 Nov 25).

Learning to recognize novel words and novel objects

Viviani, Eva
2019-11-25

Abstract

Reading seems as easy and natural as listening. It is still not clear how we acquire this skill, and how visual word identification mechanisms are refined through reading experience. Theoretical models of word recognition describe general principles of skilled reading behaviour. However, these models have been based on averaged data from relatively small samples of skilled readers, mainly English native speakers, and are based on the assumption that skilled reading involves a specialized system of word identification. In this thesis it is proposed that expert reading requires the development and refinement of basic visual processing mechanisms originally employed to identify everyday objects, and then adapted to reading. To test this hypothesis, I carried out three experiments investigating: (i) how L2 visual word recognition changes with growing proficiency; (ii) how novel lexical memories are integrated into the lexicon, i.e., how they interact with previously existing words; and (iii) how sensitivity to the lexicon statistics plays out in the process of learning a novel set of visual stimuli, either in the language and non--language domain.
Crepaldi, Davide
Viviani, Eva
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Descrizione: Learning to recognize novel words and novel objects
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11767/104804
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