In the past decades, rapid advances in the experimental control of quantum systems have opened up unparalleled capabilities of engineering exotic quantum states. Nowadays, we may consider ourselves witnesses of a second quantum revolution as strongly correlated quantum matter is regularly created, on a daily basis, within the most diverse platforms, e.g. arrays of Rydberg atoms, ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices, superconducting qubits, trapped ions, and quantum dots. In this era, dubbed Noisy-Intermediate Scale Quantum (NISQ) era, the effort in pursuing research for realizing quantum technologies with practical purposes, such as quantum computing, simulations, communication and metrology, has greatly accelerated, and we are just starting to experience the immense progress that could be achieved. The remarkable breakthrough we are facing builds upon seminal theoretical and experimental advances in quantum physics. The key achievements in atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics have opened up the possibility of controlling, trapping, and measuring single atoms, one by one, with high accuracy and reliability. In parallel, from a theoretical point of view, the study of quantum entanglement and correlations has bridged AMO physics and quantum information with crucial proposals for the realization of universal quantum computers. In this context, entanglement has emerged as one of the key tools to characterize and to exploit quantum many-body systems for quantum information purposes. We will study quantum entanglement in several scenarios to investigate and probe complex quantum many-body systems. We will consider examples ranging from generic mixed states in equilibrium to out-of-equilibrium dynamics, with and without dissipation, and topologically non-trivial systems. The leitmotif of this work will be how entanglement and correlations can be exploited to characterize the many-body quantum state describing a physical system and how entanglement can be detected in an experimentally efficient manner.

Probing and detecting entanglement in synthetic quantum matter / Vitale, Vittorio. - (2022 Oct 21).

Probing and detecting entanglement in synthetic quantum matter

VITALE, VITTORIO
2022

Abstract

In the past decades, rapid advances in the experimental control of quantum systems have opened up unparalleled capabilities of engineering exotic quantum states. Nowadays, we may consider ourselves witnesses of a second quantum revolution as strongly correlated quantum matter is regularly created, on a daily basis, within the most diverse platforms, e.g. arrays of Rydberg atoms, ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices, superconducting qubits, trapped ions, and quantum dots. In this era, dubbed Noisy-Intermediate Scale Quantum (NISQ) era, the effort in pursuing research for realizing quantum technologies with practical purposes, such as quantum computing, simulations, communication and metrology, has greatly accelerated, and we are just starting to experience the immense progress that could be achieved. The remarkable breakthrough we are facing builds upon seminal theoretical and experimental advances in quantum physics. The key achievements in atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics have opened up the possibility of controlling, trapping, and measuring single atoms, one by one, with high accuracy and reliability. In parallel, from a theoretical point of view, the study of quantum entanglement and correlations has bridged AMO physics and quantum information with crucial proposals for the realization of universal quantum computers. In this context, entanglement has emerged as one of the key tools to characterize and to exploit quantum many-body systems for quantum information purposes. We will study quantum entanglement in several scenarios to investigate and probe complex quantum many-body systems. We will consider examples ranging from generic mixed states in equilibrium to out-of-equilibrium dynamics, with and without dissipation, and topologically non-trivial systems. The leitmotif of this work will be how entanglement and correlations can be exploited to characterize the many-body quantum state describing a physical system and how entanglement can be detected in an experimentally efficient manner.
Dalmonte, Marcello
Santoro, Giuseppe Ernesto
Vitale, Vittorio
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11767/129911
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