What we see in the present is affected by what we saw in the recent past. Serial dependence - a bias making a current stimulus to appear more similar to a previous one - has been indeed shown to be ubiquitous in vision. At the neural level, serial dependence is accompanied by a signature of stimulus history (i.e., past stimulus information) emerging from early visual-evoked activity. However, whether this neural signature effectively reflects the behavioural bias is unclear. Here we address this question by assessing the neural (electrophysiological) and behavioural signature of stimulus history in human subjects (both male and female), in the context of numerosity, duration, and size perception. First, our results show that while the behavioural effect is task-dependent, its neural signature also reflects task-irrelevant dimensions of a past stimulus, suggesting a partial dissociation between the mechanisms mediating the encoding of stimulus history and the behavioural bias itself. Second, we show that performing a task is not a necessary condition to observe the neural signature of stimulus history, but that in the presence of an active task such a signature is significantly amplified. Finally, and more importantly, we show that the pattern of brain activity in a relatively early latency window (starting at ∼35-65 ms after stimulus onset) significantly predicts the behavioural effect. Overall, our results thus demonstrate that the encoding of past stimulus information in neural signals does indeed reflect serial dependence, and that serial dependence occurs at a relatively early level of visual processing.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT:What we perceive is determined not only by the information reaching our sensory organs, but also by the context in which the information is embedded in. What we saw in the recent past (perceptual history) can indeed modulate the perception of a current stimulus in an attractive way - a bias that is ubiquitous in vision. Here we show that this bias can be predicted by the pattern of brain activity reflecting the encoding of past stimulus information, very early after the onset of a stimulus. This in turn suggests that the integration of past and present sensory information mediating the attractive bias occurs early in the visual processing stream, and likely involves early visual cortices.

Perceptual History Biases Are Predicted by Early Visual-Evoked Activity / Fornaciai, M; Togoli, I; Bueti, D. - In: THE JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE. - ISSN 0270-6474. - 43:21(2023), pp. 3860-3875. [10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1451-22.2023]

Perceptual History Biases Are Predicted by Early Visual-Evoked Activity

Fornaciai, M
Conceptualization
;
Togoli, I
Conceptualization
;
Bueti, D
Supervision
2023-01-01

Abstract

What we see in the present is affected by what we saw in the recent past. Serial dependence - a bias making a current stimulus to appear more similar to a previous one - has been indeed shown to be ubiquitous in vision. At the neural level, serial dependence is accompanied by a signature of stimulus history (i.e., past stimulus information) emerging from early visual-evoked activity. However, whether this neural signature effectively reflects the behavioural bias is unclear. Here we address this question by assessing the neural (electrophysiological) and behavioural signature of stimulus history in human subjects (both male and female), in the context of numerosity, duration, and size perception. First, our results show that while the behavioural effect is task-dependent, its neural signature also reflects task-irrelevant dimensions of a past stimulus, suggesting a partial dissociation between the mechanisms mediating the encoding of stimulus history and the behavioural bias itself. Second, we show that performing a task is not a necessary condition to observe the neural signature of stimulus history, but that in the presence of an active task such a signature is significantly amplified. Finally, and more importantly, we show that the pattern of brain activity in a relatively early latency window (starting at ∼35-65 ms after stimulus onset) significantly predicts the behavioural effect. Overall, our results thus demonstrate that the encoding of past stimulus information in neural signals does indeed reflect serial dependence, and that serial dependence occurs at a relatively early level of visual processing.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT:What we perceive is determined not only by the information reaching our sensory organs, but also by the context in which the information is embedded in. What we saw in the recent past (perceptual history) can indeed modulate the perception of a current stimulus in an attractive way - a bias that is ubiquitous in vision. Here we show that this bias can be predicted by the pattern of brain activity reflecting the encoding of past stimulus information, very early after the onset of a stimulus. This in turn suggests that the integration of past and present sensory information mediating the attractive bias occurs early in the visual processing stream, and likely involves early visual cortices.
2023
43
21
3860
3875
10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1451-22.2023
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/37085319/
Fornaciai, M; Togoli, I; Bueti, D
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11767/131972
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